1952 Academy Awards

The 1952 Academy Awards ceremony was held March 19, 1953 at the RKO Pantages Theatre in Hollywood, California. Oscars were given in recognition of outstanding efforts in films premiering in 1952. It was simultaneously broadcast from the NBC International Theatre in New York City. The 25th Academy Awards was the first ceremony to be televised.

Bob Hope hosted the ceremony in Hollywood with Fredric March hosting in New York. The star-studded cast of presenters included Olivia de Havilland, Ray Milland, Loretta Young, Ginger Rogers, Jimmy Stewart, and John Wayne.

THE 1952 ACADEMY AWARDS WINNERS WERE

BEST PICTURE

Cecil B. DeMille for Paramount Pictures – The Greatest Show on Earth
Stanley Kramer for United Artists – High Noon
Pandro S. Berman for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer – Ivanhoe
John Huston for United Artists – Moulin Rouge
John Ford and Merian C. Cooper for Republic Pictures – The Quiet Man

The Greatest Show on Earth won the 1952 Academy Awards for Best Picture for the film set in the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus arenas. Many felt it was one of the worst films to win in the Best Picture category and that it was awarded in tribute to Cecil B. DeMille as Director of the film as well as for his lifetime achievements in film making.

The film starring Betty Hutton, Cornel Wilde, and Charlton Heston included spectacular circus acts and behind the scenes world of The Greatest Show on Earth. The only Oscar nominations received were Best Picture and Best Director. Cecil B. DeMille lost out as Director to John Ford in the Quiet Man. Although lacking in critical acclaim the film’s box office is among the nation’s highest grossing.

BEST ACTOR

Gary Cooper – High Noon
Marlon Brando – Viva Zapata!
Kirk Douglas – The Bad and the Beautiful
José Ferrer – Moulin Rouge
Alec Guinness – The Lavender Hill Mob

GARY COOPER was the 1952 Academy Awards winner in the Best Actor category for “High Noon”, a crowd favorite then and now.

Gary Cooper was born Frank James Cooper on May 7, 1901 and died May 13, 1961 at age 60. He was married to Veronic Balfe from 1933 until his death in 1961.

Always playing a hero and most notably in westerns, Cooper appeared in over one hundred films. He received five Academy Award nominations and won twice for his roles in “Sergeant York” and “High Noon.”

Gary Cooper Best Actor High Noon
Gary Cooper and Grace Kelly in High Noon

1952 Academy Awards Best Actress

Shirley Booth – Come Back, Little Sheba
Joan Crawford – Sudden Fear
Bette Davis – The Star
Julie Harris – The Member of the Wedding
Susan Hayward – With a Song in My Heart

SHIRLEY BOOTH was the 1952 Academy Awards winner for Best Actress for her performance in “Come Back, Little Sheba.”

Shirley Booth was born August 30, 1898 and died October 16, 1992 at the age of 94.

Booth began her acting career on stage and it is said she preferred the stage over film making. She won a Tony award for the stage production of “Come Back, Little Sheba” as well as for her performance in the film version. She became the first actress ever to win both a Tony and an Oscar for the same role.

1952 BEST DIRECTOR

John Ford – The Quiet Man
Cecil B. DeMille – The Greatest Show on Earth
John Huston – Moulin Rouge
Joseph L. Mankiewicz – Five Fingers
Fred Zinnemann – High Noon

1952 ACADEMY AWARDS FOR BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

Anthony Quinn – Viva Zapata!
Richard Burton – My Cousin Rachel
Arthur Hunnicutt – The Big Sky
Victor McLaglen – The Quiet Man
Jack Palance – Sudden Fear

1952 ACADEMY AWARDS FOR BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

Gloria Grahame – The Bad and the Beautiful
Jean Hagen – Singin’ in the Rain
Colette Marchand – Moulin Rouge
Terry Moore – Come Back, Little Sheba
Thelma Ritter – With a Song in My Heart

BEST COSTUME DESIGN IN BLACK AND WHITE

The Bad and the Beautiful – Helen Rose
Affair in Trinidad – Jean Louis
Carrie – Edith Head
My Cousin Rachel – Charles LeMaire and Dorothy Jeakins
Sudden Fear – Sheila O’Brien

BEST COSTUME DESIGN IN COLOR

Moulin Rouge – Marcel Vertes
The Greatest Show on Earth – Edith Head, Dorothy Jeakins and Miles White
The Merry Widow – Helen Rose and Gile Steele
With a Song in My Heart – Charles LeMaire

BEST ORIGINAL SONG

“High Noon” from High Noon – Music by Dimitri Tiomkin; Lyric by Ned Washington
“Am I in Love” from Son of Paleface – Music and Lyric by Jay Livingston and Ray Evans
“Because You’re Mine” from Because You’re Mine – Music by Nicholas Brodszky; Lyric by Sammy Cahn
“Thumbelina” from Hans Christian Andersen – Music and Lyric by Frank Loesser
“Zing a Little Zong” from Just for You – Music by Harry Warren; Lyric by Leo Robin

BEST MUSICAL SCORE

With a Song in My Heart – Alfred Newman
Hans Christian Andersen – Walter Scharf
The Jazz Singer – Ray Heindorf and Max Steiner
The Medium – Gian-Carlo Menotti
Singin’ in the Rain – Lennie Hayton

BEST SCREENPLAY

The Lavender Hill Mob – T.E.B. Clarke
The Atomic City – Sydney Boehm
Breaking the Sound Barrier – Terence Rattigan
Pat and Mike – Ruth Gordon and Garson Kanin
Viva Zapata! – John Steinbeck

BEST STORY

The Greatest Show on Earth – Frederic M. Frank, Theodore St. John and Frank Cavett
My Son John – Leo McCarey
The Narrow Margin – Martin Goldsmith and Jack Leonard
The Pride of St. Louis – Guy Trosper
The Sniper – Edna Anhalt and Edward Anhalt

BEST STORY AND SCREENPLAY

The Bad and the Beautiful – Charles Schnee
Five Fingers – Michael Wilson
High Noon – Carl Foreman
The Man in the White Suit – Roger MacDougall, John Dighton and Alexander Mackendrick
The Quiet Man – Frank S. Nugent

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY IN BLACK AND WHITE

The Bad and the Beautiful – Robert Surtees
The Big Sky – Russell Harlan
My Cousin Rachel – Joseph LaShelle
Navajo – Virgil Miller
Sudden Fear – Charles Lang, Jr.

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY IN COLOR

The Quiet Man – Winton C. Hoch and Archie Stout
Hans Christian Andersen – Harry Stradling
Ivanhoe – F.A. Young
Million Dollar Mermaid – George J. Folsey
The Snows of Kilimanjaro – Leon Shamroy

BEST ART DIRECTION IN BLACK AND WHITE

The Bad and the Beautiful – Art Direction: Cedric Gibbons and Edward Carfagno; Set Decoration: Edwin B. Willis and Keogh Gleason
Carrie – Art Direction: Hal Pereira and Roland Anderson; Set Decoration: Emile Kuri
My Cousin Rachel – Art Direction: Lyle Wheeler and John DeCuir; Set Decoration: Walter M. Scott
Rashomon – Art Direction: So Matsuyama; Set Decoration: H. Motsumoto
Viva Zapata! – Art Direction: Lyle Wheeler and Leland Fuller; Set Decoration: Thomas Little and Claude Carpenter

BEST ART DIRECTION IN COLOR

Moulin Rouge – Art Direction: Paul Sheriff; Set Decoration: Marcel Vertes
Hans Christian Andersen – Art Direction: Richard Day and Clave; Set Decoration: Howard Bristol
The Merry Widow – Art Direction: Cedric Gibbons and Paul Groesse; Set Decoration: Edwin B. Willis and Arthur Krams
The Quiet Man – Art Direction: Frank Hotaling; Set Decoration: John McCarthy, Jr. and Charles Thompson
The Snows of Kilimanjaro – Art Direction: Lyle Wheeler and John DeCuir; Set Decoration: Thomas Little and Paul S. Fox

BEST FILM EDITING

High Noon – Elmo Williams and Harry Gerstad
Come Back, Little Sheba – Warren Low
Flat Top – William Austin
The Greatest Show on Earth – Anne Bauchens
Moulin Rouge – Ralph Kemplen

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS

Plymouth Adventure

1951 Academy Awards
1953 Academy Awards
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